Poet Scott Cairns

Scott Cairns, founder and editor of the
St. Katherine Review

Issue #214 | March 16, 2011

Features
Spotlight on Glen East: Young Adult Fiction with Sara Zarr
Image’s 2011 Shaw Fellow: Hannah Crippen
St. Katherine Review Debut Issue
The Ringer by Jenny Shank

Gallery Watch
John Frame’s Three Fragments of a Lost Tale

Message Board
In Touch Magazine Call for Submissions
Bridge Songs Art Extravaganza Call for Submissions
Block Island Poetry Project Announces Poetry and Faith Weekend with Scott Cairns
Taproot Theatre Presents The Beams are Creaking

ImageNews
Image Readings: Paige Eve Chant
Subscribe to Image in Print

Features

Spotlight on Glen East: Young Adult Fiction with Sara Zarr

Sara Zarr Do you have a passion for young adult literature? Do you daydream about writing a young adult novel of your own, or do you have a YA manuscript lying around that you’ve shown to no one but your twelve-year-old niece? If so, register now for Young Adult Fiction, taught at this year’s Glen East by novelist Sara Zarr. While this is Zarr’s first time teaching at the Glen, she is no stranger to the event: her first book, Story of a Girl—a 2007 National Book Award finalist—was workshopped at the Glen before publication. Since then Zarr has published two other acclaimed novels for young adults (with another, How to Save a Life, coming soon), as well as many essays and works of short fiction. Zarr finds a distinct reward in writing YA fiction—particularly in its unique capacity for triggering self-reflection. She attributes this to how in YA fiction, protagonists "don't have the benefit of the insight and hindsight gained in the years since adolescence; they're still in it. They don't have practice navigating turmoil and change. Everything is new. For the writer, this means turning back the clock and getting back in touch with the self she was before she accumulated the many layers of protection (and, sometimes, cynicism) that come with being a so-called grownup.” Don’t miss your chance to work with Zarr (also a Good Letters blogger) at Glen East, where you will learn about fiction fundamentals—voice, character, and plot—in ways that are specific to writing for and about teenagers.

To learn more, click here. To register, click here.

Image’s 2011 Shaw Fellow: Hannah Crippen

2011 Shaw Fellow The Image staff is delighted to announce our Luci Shaw Fellow for the summer of 2011: Hannah Crippen. Raised in Minnesota, Hannah is currently a senior at Luther College in Decorah, Iowa, where she is finishing up her B.A. in English with a writing emphasis. Besides writing, she’s recently discovered a love of cooking, a pleasure that’s convinced her there's special magic in a good bell pepper, red onion, and dash of chipotle hot sauce. Still, her happiest moments involve curling on the couch with a book in one hand and a cup of strong coffee in the other—a perfect fit for Seattle! Living in Nottingham, England, for a year confirmed Hannah’s great eagerness for travel, which is visible in the ample postcards and photographs covering her bedroom walls. As Shaw Fellow, Hannah is thrilled to add three new destinations to her traveling credentials: she’ll join the Image staff in Seattle and assist at the Glen East Workshop in South Hadley, MA and at the Glen West Workshop in Santa Fe, NM.

For more information about the Luci Shaw Fellowship, click here.

St. Katherine Review Debut Issue

St. Katherine ReviewSaint Katherine Review is a new literary journal coming out of a new college. The pilot issue of the review appeared this January, published through Saint Katherine College in Encinitas, California, the first Orthodox liberal arts college in America, which opens its doors this fall. Poet Scott Cairns (a visiting professor at the college) is the Review’s founder and editor, and the staff includes Claire Bateman (poetry), Caroline Langston (fiction), and Kathleen Norris (nonfiction). Like Image, Saint Katherine Review is informed by a religious way of looking at the world, but that doesn’t mean ruling out particular kinds of art or writing; rather, it involves an openness to the world as it is. And though the college is Orthodox, the Review publishes writers of all stripes. As Cairns puts it, “There is a rich literary aesthetic—variously characterized—that is essentially Orthodox in its apprehension of the God’s enormity and of the vertiginous expanse of the God’s creation. Anytime you have writers who trust the labor of language to reveal to them (and subsequently to others) a textured and inexhaustible reality that isn’t circumscribed by expectations and intentions, then you have work that strikes me as Orthodox at heart.” The pilot issue includes fiction by A.G. Harmon and Erin McGraw; poems by Jennifer Atkinson, Eric Pankey, and Nick Samaras; a translation of a new essay from Russian poet Olga Sedakova on morality and art, in which she writes, “The enemy of artistic morality is mediocrity”; and book briefs compiled by the staff of the indispensable Eighth Day Books of Wichita, KS. Image is proud and happy to welcome this new member to the family of literary quarterlies!

To learn more, click here.

The Ringer by Jenny Shank

The RingerJenny Shank’s debut novel, The Ringer, honors a great American pastime: baseball. Baseball is present to comfort, save, or even—in the greatest moments of need—convict Shank’s characters when religion fails to do so. Ed O’Fallon, a middle-aged father of three, has been demoted to coaching his daughter’s tee-ball team after parents complain about harsh tirades delivered while coaching his older sons’ baseball team. He now spends Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Saturdays trying to convince the six-year-old Purple Unicorns to spend less time picking dandelions in the outfield and more time running laps and fielding grounders. Meanwhile, Ray Maestas, a twelve-year-old pitching phenomenon, is struggling to make sense of his father’s recent murder by Denver police. In an attempt to keep him off the streets and out of trouble, his mother, Patricia, moves him from the local Catholic recreational league to one of the most competitive teams in the city, where the protection that both youth and baseball once afforded him quickly fades. Shank’s narrative offers a sophisticated rumination on the meaning of childhood, the persistent heartache of parenting, and the saving graces of young bodies in motion. “That was the thing with kids,” notes Patricia. “They were so much more than merely the qualities of one parent added to those of the other. [They] were relentlessly their own people, capable of surprising [us] on any given day.” The Ringer is a quintessential American story that deftly and compassionately examines the nuances of race, culture, and religion in contemporary society—and it does so with heart, wit, and playfulness. But Shank shows baseball to be more than a game. In this novel, it is a way of celebrating—and at times grieving—that awful, inescapable, and ever-surprising feat of being human.

To own your copy, click here.

Gallery Watch

John Frame’s Three Fragments of a Lost Tale

John Frame's Three Fragments of a Lost TaleFrom March 12 to June 20, John Frame (featured in Image issue #41) debuts five years of meticulous work in Three Fragments of a Lost Tale at the Huntington Art Gallery in San Morino, California. The exhibit introduces an eclectic cast of characters sculpted from wood and found materials, and the viewer must piece together their complex stories of loss and discovery through expressive stage settings, stop-motion animated drama, and still photographs. Far from offering a linear narrative, Frame’s work asks viewers to contemplate their own intriguing capability to interpret stories, as well as contemplate their own losses and discoveries as they begin to identify with Frame’s characters. The exhibit is enhanced by an accompanying book with eighty-five illustrations and an essay by art critic David Pagel, who muses that Frame’s work poses questions “that just may be impossible to answer.” You can find more information about the exhibit and see a gorgeous short film on Frame’s artistic process here.

Message Board
Post here to reach thousands of readers interested in the intersection of art and faith. We welcome messages about job listings, local events, conferences, prizes, calls for papers, and more. Submit your messages by sending an e-mail here.

In Touch Magazine Call for Submissions

In Touch, the monthly magazine of In Touch Ministries, now features work by contemporary Christian poets, including recent contributions from Nicholas Samaras, Anya Silver, Luci Shaw, and Robert Siegel. They’re currently seeking poetry submissions—by known and unknown voices—that explore the beauties and complexities of life in Christ and reveal how poetry enhances relationship with God, neighbor, and creation. Please send three to five unpublished poems (PDF or Word .doc files) to poetry@intouch.org. Due to space limitations, shorter poems (30 lines or less) are preferred. Payment is $50 per poem. To receive a digital sample of the magazine, send an e-mail inquiry to the address above.

Bridge Songs Call for Submissions

Bridge Songs is an art and music event from June 17-19 in Edmonton, Alberta, featuring live music, an album release, two art galleries, spoken word, short film, and artist workshops. They are currently seeking submissions of short film and visual art that explores this year's theme, “Progress." The deadline for the Feature Gallery is April 15, and the deadlines for the Event Space (larger gallery) and Short Film Presentation are both May 31. For more information about this art and music extravaganza and specifics about submissions, visit the Bridge Songs website.

Block Island Poetry Project Announces Poetry and Faith Weekend with Scott Cairns

From March 31 to April 3, the Block Island Poetry Project and Harbor Church will sponsor a three-day workshop in Block Island, Rhode Island, focusing on the connections between poetry and faith. In addition to presentations by acclaimed poet Scott Cairns, director of the creative writing program at the University of Missouri, there will be a series of workshops, seminars, and performances by other poets, theologians, musicians, and a Native American shaman, exploring rich themes like "Poetry as Prayer" and "Poets and the Old Testament." Two events on Friday and Saturday night will be open to the general public by donation; for full participation in the workshop, registration is required. The cost of registration is just $185 ($95 for Block Island residents), and senior adults and students may have their fees waived, although donations are welcome. Lodging and meals are provided for an additional charge. For schedule information, and to register or make room reservations, contact Lisa Starr at 401-466-9616. To visit the website, click here.

Taproot Theatre Presents The Beams are Creaking

Beginning March 25, Seattle’s Taproot Theatre presents The Beams are Creaking, the riveting true story of Dietrich Bonhoeffer and his involvement in the German resistance during World War II. The play follows German Lutheran pastor Bonhoeffer in Germany circa 1933 as he battles questions of morality, political allegiance and religious conviction with Nazism blooming all around him. Bonhoeffer’s membership in the Abwehr German Military Intelligence, secretly organized against the Nazi party and seeking to undermine Hitler’s initiatives, produces a tale of intrigue, conspiracy, and thrills that will have everybody on the edge of their seats. Director Karen Lund writes, “In the face of the same issues would any of us have had the same courage? It’s a thrilling ride—a spy story, a romance, a philosophical debate all at once...and it’s true!” The show runs through April 23. Tickets and information can be found here.

ImageNews -- The Scoop on Our Programs

Image Readings: Paige Eve Chant

Paige Eve ChantSpending the academic year in residence at Image's Milton Center, Paige Eve Chant is working on a collection of linked stories that explores the myth of absence, and the inescapability of embodiment and grace, as generation of one family—some living, some dead—make their way through grief. Chant is also teaching creative writing classes at Seattle Pacific University. Chant's work has appeared in Santa Clara Review, Tea Party Magazine, and Flint Hills Review. In 2009, she was a finalist in Glimmer Train magazine's "Family Matters" competition. She recently had an essay published in the Seattle Review.

Click here to hear Paige read from her novel-in-progress.

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If you like reading about great new art and writing inspired by faith in ImageUpdate, and you're ready to get down to reading and seeing the stuff itself, it's time to subscribe to Image. Each quarter our editors comb the world of art and letters to bring you our favorite new work--work that respects transcendent mystery as well as the gritty truth of the material world that bears the divine imprint. A one-year subscription gets you four beautifully produced issues delivered right to your door. Ninety percent of the journal's content is not available on our website, but only through what we call "the sacrament of print." Click here to get the magazine Terry Tempest Williams calls "evocative and inspiring" and Bret Lott calls "the most meaningful literary journal being produced today."

ImageUpdate

Publisher: Gregory Wolfe
Managing Editor: Dyana Herron
Layout: Anna Johnson
Contributors: Dyana Herron, Mary Kenagy Mitchell, Taylor Morris, and Gregory Wolfe.

ImageUpdate is the biweekly e-mail newsletter from Image, a quarterly print journal that explores the relationship between Judeo-Christian faith and art through contemporary fiction, poetry, painting, sculpture, architecture, film, music, and dance. Each issue also features interviews, memoirs, essays, and reviews.

ImageUpdate brings you news about books, CDs, organizations, websites, conferences, exhibitions, and tours--all of which inhabit the intersection between faith and imagination. ImageUpdate will also notify you whenever a new issue of Image is printed, an Image event is upcoming, or new content is posted to our website.

Copyright © 2011 Center for Religious Humanism. All rights reserved.

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