Skip to content
Menu

Posts Tagged ‘Peggy Rosenthal’

Poetry Friday: “Curriculum Vitae”

By Peggy RosenthalOctober 11, 2019

What fun to find a sonnet in Image 102! Yes, a true sonnet—following the meter (iambic pentameter), stanza breaks, and rhyme scheme of a traditional sonnet. Other contemporary poets have explored the sonnet form engagingly: I think of Mark Jarman’s Unholy Sonnets and Jeanne Murray Walker’s new collection Pilgrim: You Find the Path by Walking.…

Read More

Poetry Friday: “Glosa”

By Peggy RosenthalSeptember 13, 2019

“Glosa” refers to an invented language created as a way for all the world’s speakers to understand each other.

Read More

Robert Cording, Simon Weil, and “Attention”

By Peggy RosenthalJuly 25, 2019

Decades ago, when I was being drawn from atheism through agnosticism toward Christianity, somehow Simone Weil’s writings came into my hands. Literally into my hands: so struck was I by her words that I copied pages and pages of them into my journal. Weil became my spiritual director. She led my spirit to eventually embrace…

Read More

Poetry Friday: “Reflection upon Psalm 121”

By Christopher HowellJuly 12, 2019

My husband and I pray together after breakfast and after dinner, using The Liturgy of the Hours (a version of the former breviary used by Catholic priests but, after Vatican II, made available to the laity). Each Morning and Evening Prayer includes two psalms. Psalm 121 is read on one Friday evening every four weeks.…

Read More

Art as Survival: The Terezín Concentration Camp

By Peggy RosenthalJune 17, 2019

I go to lots of classical music concerts, but I’ve never been so moved as I was by this one. It wasn’t just the profundity of the music; it was also, and especially, the context in which it was composed. The concert was called Music from Terezín Concentration Camp. I’m ashamed to admit that I…

Read More

Poetry Friday: “Articulation”

By Scott CairnsMay 24, 2019

It’s a truism that the writer’s material is words. We rely on our words to do their work: to “mean” something. But in his poem “Articulation,” Scott Cairns questions this reliance. The poem’s speaker says that his only “certainty,” paradoxically, is that his language “falls / ever short.” What he has “come to trust” is…

Read More

The Fearless Curiosity of the Ying Quartet

By Peggy RosenthalMay 8, 2019

Ying Quartet, l-r: David Ying (cello), Janet Ying (violin), new first violinist Robin Scott, and Phillip Ying (viola) outside Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, Eastman School of Music March 23, 2015 // photo by J. Adam Fenster / University of Rochester Of all the arts, music is the most difficult to write about. Maybe because…

Read More

Poetry Friday: “Before All Things”

By Tania RunyanApril 26, 2019

Imagine the Gospel narrative taking place right in your home town, right now. How would you know what was going on? How would you react? This is what Tania Runyan imagines with delightful grace in “Before All Things.” In her telling, the key moments in the gospels happen almost simultaneously. First, Christ dies as “a…

Read More

Poetry Friday: “March: Saint John the Divine”

By Elizabeth SpiresMarch 15, 2019

“These Lenten weeks are wordless, gray and slow.” It takes poet Elizabeth Spires four verses to get to this line. Before this, the poem’s speaker imagines a more colorful and lively season, as the church garden’s peacock “spread its glorious tail.” The feathers remind the speaker “of doves descending, the promise of a season yet…

Read More

Poetry Friday: “I Stand and Knock”

By Daniel PriestJanuary 25, 2019

What pulls me into this poem is the way we’re drawn into a cosmic drama which is, finally, salvific. The title, combined with the very first lines, brings to mind Matt. 7:7, “knock and the door will be opened to you” and Rev. 3:20, “behold, I stand at the door and knock.” Holding these lines…

Read More

Welcome to Image. 

We curate content just for you. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter ImageUpdate for free.


Pin It on Pinterest