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Poetry

1.

One’s waking of itself obtains
_____a rising and—one might say—a dazed,
__________surprising glee at having met
within sleep’s netherworld one’s own
_____dim shadowed psyche, and survived.

One’s walking soon thereafter well
_____into the morning’s modest glare
__________proves—if all goes swimmingly—yet
further evidence of being
_____obliquely well attended, proves

discreetly provident of one’s
_____invisible surround and all
__________that hidden cloud now pressing. Such
hid crowd and its solicitous
_____attention can thereafter vest

in every snag a prospect further
_____gathering. The lapping shoreline
__________lay with its habitual—one
might note—recurrent chord attending
_____its late-set revision of the edge

by which one visits once again
_____one’s limits, next the bay. And I
__________set off along its seam to see
just what by new laborious
_____revision had been newly made.

2.

What I found were varied clumps—debris
_____of purple kelp, the toddler’s pail,
__________some several plastic shovels,
the odd cork sandal, and the always
______unnerving scraps of this or that

ruined shorebird, the orange, failed
_____armor of the lobster, picked clean
__________by beak and animated grit.
What to make of this collision—
_____of cluttered mind and cluttered shore?

3.

Of endless if particular
_____destruction, yet accompanied
__________by vast enormity and might,
I made no great conclusion, save
_____to shed my walking gear and dive.


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