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Issue 68

Gregory Wolfe takes on the modern saying, “I’m spiritual but not religious,” flipping it on its head; Robert Clark writes lovingly of director Terence Davies; and Rod Pattenden explores how the art of Emmanuel Garibay is “an artist for our time, when art, politics, religion, and power collide.” With poems by Scott Cairns, Kate Daniels, and Steven Haven; a conversation with poet and playwright Jeanne Murray Walker; fiction by Charles Turner; essays by Judith Rock and Deborah Joy Corey; and more.

Contributors

Bruce Beasley’s latest books of poems are Signs and Abominations (Wesleyan), Lord Brain(Georgia), and The Corpse Flower: New and Selected Poems (Washington).

Scott Cairns has recently been published in Poetry, Books & Culture, Sojourners, Vineyards, and Best American Spiritual Writing 2009. His latest book is a long essay, The End of Suffering: Finding Purpose in Pain (Paraclete). He holds the Catherine Paine Middlebush Chair in English at the University of Missouri, and periodically serves as a visiting professor at Saint Katherine College in Encinitas, California.

Robert Clark’s many books include the novels Love Among the Ruins (Vintage), In the Deep Midwinter, Mr. White’s Confession (both from Picador); the nonfiction works The Solace of Food (Steerforth), My Grandfather’s House (Picador), and most recently, Dark Water: Flood and Redemption in the City of Masterpieces (Doubleday). He teaches in the Seattle Pacific MFA program.

Deborah Joy Corey’s work has been included in Agni, Ploughshares, Fiction, and many other publications. She was recently awarded the Stella Kupferberg Memorial Short Story Prize by the radio program Selected Shorts. She is also a recipient of the Books in Canada First Novel Award and the “Elle’s Lettres” Readers’ Prize. She has just completed her third novel and a story collection, You Are What You Drive.

Kate Daniels’s most recent volume of poetry is A Walk in Victoria’s Secret (Louisiana State). She was recently awarded the Hanes Prize for Poetry from the Fellowship of Southern Writers. She lives in Nashville and teaches in the MFA program in creative writing at Vanderbilt University.

Priscilla Gilman grew up on the Gulf Coast of Texas and now lives in the hills of Vermont. She writes as much as she’s able and draws stick-figure cartoons for her blog, www.heaveninmyfoot.com.

Robert Grunst is a professor of English at Saint Catherine University and author of the collection The Smallest Bird in North America (New Issues). His poems and essays have appeared in American Literary Review, Cimarron Review, Iowa Review, Saint Ann’s Review, and Tar River Poetry.

Stephen Haven is the author of the poetry collections The Long Silence of the Mohawk Carpet Smokestacks (UNM/West End), and Dust and Bread (Turning Point), for which he was named Ohio Poet of the Year. His poems have appeared in Salmagundi, Southern Review, Parnassus, American Poetry Review, and others. He is director of the Ashland University MFA Program.

K.A. Hays’s first book was Dear Apocalypse (Carnegie Mellon). Poems from the collection appear in Best American Poetry 2009, Yale Anthology of Younger American Poetry, Southern Review, Missouri Review, and elsewhere.

Roxane Beth Johnson’s first book of poetry, Jubilee (Anhinga), was the winner of the 2005 Philip Levine Prize for Poetry. She has also won Pushcart and AWP Prizes. Her work has or will appear in Beloit Poetry Journal, Chelsea, Georgia Review, Prairie Schooner, and thePushcart Prize anthology.

Steve Kronen has received fellowships from the NEA and the Bread Loaf and Sewanee Writers’ Conferences and won two Florida Arts grants. He is the author of Splendor (BOA) andEmpirical Evidence (Georgia), and has been published in Poetry, Georgia Review, Yale Review, and others.

Jessica Murphy Moo’s fiction has appeared in the Atlantic and Memorious. She is a recipient of Image’s Milton Center Fellowship and communications editor at the Seattle Opera.

Rod Pattenden is a curator, art historian, and theologian who writes on spirituality and contemporary art. He has recently contributed to the volume Visual Theology, as well as other publications and catalogues. He regularly runs workshops in creativity through InterPlay Australia, is chair the Blake Prize for Religious Art, and works as a campus minister at Macquarie University in Sydney (www.rodpattenden.id.au).

John Poch's most recent book of poems is Dolls (Orchises). He teaches at Texas Tech University and is the editor of 32 poems magazine.

Judith Rock has worked as a playwright, actor, professor, and police officer. Her first novel, a historical mystery called The Rhetoric of Death, was recently published by Berkley; a second,The Eloquence of Blood, is due out next year. She lives in Sarasota, Florida, where she volunteers at a bird rescue and rehab center.

Luci Shaw is a poet, essayist, teacher, and lecturer. Her most recent books are What the Light Was Like (Wordfarm), Accompanied by Angels: Poems of the Incarnation (Eerdmans), and Breath for the Bones: Essays on Art, Imagination, and Spirit (Thomas Nelson). She is writer-in-residence at Regent College in Vancouver, Canada.

Dana Littlepage Smith is a teacher and chaplain at Exeter Cathedral School in Devon. She has published two books of poetry, Women Clothed with the Sun (Louisiana State), and Black Elk Dances for Queen Victoria (Cinnamon). Her poetry has been published in Stand, American Voice, New Virginia Review, and Blackbird.

Charles Turner has been publishing short stories and essays since 1965. His most recent novel is Sometimes It Causes Me to Tremble (Lion). He has also written a picture book, The Turtle and the Moon (Dutton), and co-authored a treatise on the spirituality of bread, The Feast(Harper). His plays have been produced in professional and community theaters.

Web-Exclusive Content

Read our interview with Scott Cairns, only available online!

The Ordinary Time


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Blood Blessing


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Recognizing the Stranger: The Art of Emmanuel Garibay


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Stole


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Religious but Not Spiritual


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Ars Proverbium


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At Chinese Harbor


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Ends of the Earth


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The Iberian Muse


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This Orange That


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Lenten Complaint


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The Present


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Conversion


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Another Idiot Psalm: We Say Flight


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Prayer at Evening


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close up of a glass of red wine.

Wine for Those Who Faint


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Another Idiot Psalm


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A Conversation with Jeanne Murray Walker


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Sunrise Insomnia Service


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Nothing Happens: Everything Happens


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Disciple’s Song


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Of the Body Taken In


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Sheet: A Psychology of Hatred


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Birth/Rebirth


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Web Exclusive: A Conversation with Scott Cairns


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The Kind that Heals


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Half Like Them


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Thoughts Without Order Concerning the Love of God


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blurry pink lilac pressed against the ridge of a road in front of mountains aqua green from afternoon light.

Inherited but Never Inhabited


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