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Issue 91

Featuring the art of renowned African American sculptor Martin Puryear, winner of the National Medal of the Arts, as well as the art space created by Irish American painter Sean Scully at the thousand-year-old chapel of Saint Cecilia in Montserrat, Spain. Fiction by Mika Seifert that imagines life in a dictatorship where ladders and stairs are banned; Swedish fiction writer Torgny Lindgren reimagines the patriarch Joshua as a man of metaphysical hunger; and Marilyn Abildskov story deals with the Mormon practice of baptisms for the dead. In nonfiction: Amye Day Ong’s bittersweet, comic memoir about childhood illness and Christian genre fiction, and Stina Kielsmeier-Cook on her husband’s loss of faith and her own more ambiguous spiritual journey. Becca J.R. Lachman reviews what she calls New Monastic poetry—work by writers who crave community and are finding it in surprising ways. Gregory Wolfe on Scorsese’s Silence. Interview with Michael Gruber, whose literary thrillers have supernatural underpinnings. Plus poems by Adélia Prado, Javier Acosta, Abdellatif Laâbi, and others.

Dinner with Dona Adélia


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Listening to Silence


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Romanian Orthodox Choir


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Needle


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The Ladder


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Merton Recites a Mantra


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Elijah in the Desert


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Joshua


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[I strive to live as if…]


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Tentatively, Religion


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The Baptism of Sister Arlene Anderson


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Jam Jars


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Jacob’s Ladder


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Tom as a Series of Declaratives


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Still Life with Fruits and Bread


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The Doubt that Breathes Beside You


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Earthquake


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Resurrection at Cookham


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Presence in a Space: The Flickering Contradictions of Martin Puryear


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The Scar


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Twenty-Five Years of Fresh Air


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Gathering the Light: Sean Scully’s Montserrat Chapel


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The Girl and the Fruit


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The Trick


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A Conversation with Michael Gruber


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Daughter of the Ancient Law


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Texas Blues


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Chest Percussions


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Lamentation to Move Jonathan


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To My Son Yacine


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New Monasticism, Old Homesickness: New Poetry in Review


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Merton Listens to the Requiem


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Lazarus


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