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Posts Tagged ‘science’

Heisenberg and the A-Bomb: Just Say No

By Peggy RosenthalMarch 27, 2017

I read through the article breathlessly, astonished at the moral implications of what I was learning. When I got to the end, I closed my eyes and breathed deeply, trying to begin to take in the import of what I’d just read. The article was “The Private Heisenberg and the Absent Bomb,” by Thomas Powers,…

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Poetry Friday: “The Moss Method”

By Pattiann RogersMay 6, 2016

I’ve long loved Pattiann Rogers’ poems: how they caress nature’s most minute details with acutely attentive language. Here, in “The Moss Method,” she focuses on one of nature’s most lowly living things: moss. The poem is a paean to moss’s inconspicuous virtues: its literal lowliness, its quiet power of softening sharp edges, its luscious mats…

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Poetry Friday: “When God Dreamed Eve through Adam”

By Richard ChessApril 29, 2016

The Genesis story of the creation of Adam and Eve: poets for centuries have been attracted to it. They wonder: what was in God’s mind? In Adam’s? In Eve’s? Poets wonder and re-envision the scene. Richard Chess, in “When God Dreamed Eve through Adam” (Image #85), chooses to stay in Adam’s mind—and chooses to craft…

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A Space Program

By Alissa WilkinsonMarch 21, 2016

The tenth item on a list entitled “How to Watch This Film,” which accompanies Tom Sachs’ A Space Program, says that the film is “a love letter to the analog era.” That obsession with all things handmade and non-digital was obvious as I watched the film—even though I was sitting on my couch, streaming a digital screener on…

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Science and the Death of Philosophy

By Vic SizemoreOctober 30, 2015

My boy is a bit of a science geek. He subscribes to Discover and Popular Science. They are both styled after the fashion of other pop magazines in an attempt to appeal to non-scientists (“Cold Fusion: A Special Investigation”). Popular Science focuses on technology. The past year’s issues have featured an invisible, invincible war ship,…

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Canticle of Creation

By Brian VolckSeptember 22, 2015

This post was made possible through the support of a grant from The BioLogos Foundation’s Evolution and Christian Faith program. The opinions expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of BioLogos. Though I’ve heard it said otherwise, the Great Wall of China is not the only evidence of human…

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A Lottery for Barbarians

By A.G. HarmonSeptember 10, 2015

From time to time in my unorthodox career, I’ve found myself teaching a class—be it in ethics or literature or law—which includes a reading of Shirley Jackson’s horror story, The Lottery, first introduced in eighth grade English (or it was back in the day) and having the singular distinction of being the one story most…

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No Better Place to End, Part 2

By Brian VolckAugust 13, 2015

This post was made possible through the support of a grant from The BioLogos Foundation’s Evolution and Christian Faith program. The opinions expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of BioLogos. Continued from yesterday. In describing the nature of things, the sciences and faith also remind us of the…

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No Better Place to End, Part 1

By Brian VolckAugust 12, 2015

This post was made possible through the support of a grant from The BioLogos Foundation’s Evolution and Christian Faith program. The opinions expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of BioLogos. Not long ago, while walking on the Navajo reservation after sunset as the southwest horizon’s showy magenta yielded…

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Poets and Pope Embrace our Planet

By Peggy RosenthalJuly 28, 2015

Let’s just take some of the poets in the special issue of Image (#85) on “Evolution and the Imago Dei.” (And since Pope Francis’s encyclical Laudato Sì came out nearly the same time as Image, I hear the Pope conversing with the poets.)

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